Old Testament

The Seat of Scoffers

Contributor

Many of the parallels between rabbinic and early Christian writings can be explained by their common heritage and their shared opposition to pagan society. Their attitude towards spectacles may be an exception because the Hebrew Bible does not provide any guidance in this regard, yet their arguments against pagan entertainments are often based on the same proof text (Ps 1:1). This may be the result of intensive academic communication, but it could also be traced back to a common oral tradition.

An Analysis of Job 17:25–27 in the Context of Verses 17–27

Job 19,25–27 are probably the most widely known verses from his book. This pericope is often evoked on funeral occasions, and many Christians undoubtedly ponder those while struggling with the issue of death. The current study does not aim to correct the Christian faith. From the perspective of systematic theology, the Redeemer of Job and that of the Christians is the very same Christ. This essay attempts to outline the meaning of the text through linguistic and poetical analysis. A text (including a spontaneous one) informs a reader even by the way it was created.

The faith-popularising activity of Judaism as a non-missional religion in the New Testament era

Contributor

Did the Jews engage in missionary activities in the New Testament era? Since most of the first Christians were of Jewish background, with their centre in Jerusalem, and considering the relevance of missionary activity in early Christianity, this is a highly significant question. Before the ministry of Apostle Paul, Christians of (primarily) Jewish origin were those who defined the circle and practice of potential followers of Christ.

Adalék az Énók könyve keletkezéséhez

The astronomical part of the Ethiopian Book of Enoch refers to an interesting phenomenon, namely the length of the longest day of the year. This data is particularly significant in localising this astronomical observation on the world map. Since the length of the year’s longest day depends on geographical latitude, this data could hint at the latitude of the place, i.e. the approximate geographical location where the Book of Enoch may have been composed.

“...The land is mine; you are but strangers and sojourners with me...”

Contributor

In Israel’s theological understanding the idea that YHWH is a God, who makes promises, is a rather central element. Among the numerous promises of YHWH there is none as influential to Israel’s self-understanding as the promise of the occupation of the land of Canaan. The theme of the Promised Land is prominent from the beginning to the end of the Old Testament theological thought.