Studium

“Out of nothing I have created a new and different world.”

Contributor

Much of the geometric knowledge imparted in our school days was grounded in the realm of Euclidean axioms. Yet, such knowledge proves inadequate for comprehending the full spectrum of laws and structures governing nature. Non-Euclidean geometry emerges as an indispensable tool when grappling with the intricacies of unique curved surfaces. In 1823, János Bolyai, an outstanding student at the Reformed College of Marosvásárhely (Târgu Mureș) in Transylvania, unveiled this innovative form of geometry.

In the Footsteps of the Communion Cup of Érkeserű (Cheșereu)

Contributor

The communion cup of the Reformed parish of Érkeserű (Cheșereu, Romania) was originally a plate, which was melted down at the beginning of the 19th century and made into a chalice. Its history, which can be traced back to the last third of the 16 th century, is closely linked to the history of the parish and the local landowning families, especially the Suselith-Horváth family. This study corrects and supplements earlier literature by using archival sources and source publications.

Grace or Nature?

Contributor

The Barth-Brunner debate is one of the significant moments of the Protestant theological history in the 20 th century. The replica-exchange of the two outstanding figures of dialectical theology in 1934 not only includes the theological centres of gravity of Karl Barth and Emil Brunner, but also gives insight into the sparkling theological and spiritual atmosphere of the 1930s. Brunner’s interpretation reveals a specific version of natural theology, while Barth, in the spirit of New Reformation Theology, expresses his position in terms of the authority of the Word.

“For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ…”

Contributor

The study begins with the homiletical exegesis of 2 Corinthians 8:7–9. In the first major section, preparatory elements take centre stage. Throughout the exploration of the pericope's historical, exegetical, and theological dimensions, we delve into the relationship between Paul and the Corinthians, the collection for Jerusalem and theological motifs such as incarnation and offertory. The homiletical exegesis is followed by an outline for a Christmas sermon. The final points of the study provide additional perspectives and illustrations for shaping the worship service.

The Story of the Wedding in Cana in Folk Narratives

Contributor

The author of the paper examines the representations of the story of the wedding at Cana in folklore texts, as well as in the interpretations of the non-biblical storytellers. The texts collected by the folklorists evoke the atmosphere of wedding celebrations and carnival festivities in local communities, and the expressions of the vernacular language reinforce the profane and humorous nature of what is narrated. The deviations from the biblical narrative are clearly visible in the symbolic motifs and episodes, as well as in the assessment of the actions of individual characters.

Bibliotherapy and „Bible-therapy”

Contributor

This is a follow-up to my study published in the previous issue of this journal. The concise concept of bibliotherapy encapsulates its fundamental principles: healing through literature. The method’s positive outcomes have spurred a resurgence in research, training and practical application in recent decades. In Hungary, this approach has yielded fruitful results, diversifying traditional psychological sessions and other forms of individual and group support, making it more accessible to those who may have hesitated to seek help otherwise.

Theology as a Craft

Contributor

This presentation advocates for the revival of theology as a craft, specifically by teaching theological students the craft of a theologian. To achieve this, it raises three questions: 1. What is the artisan mentality compared to the peasant mentality? 2. How should theology be understood as a craft, and how can it be taught as such? 3. Is it even permissible to pursue theology as a craft?

Bibliotherapy and "Bible-therapy"

Contributor

The concise concept of bibliotherapy encapsulates its fundamental principles: healing through literature. The method’s positive outcomes have spurred a resurgence in research, training and practical application in recent decades. In Hungary, this approach has yielded fruitful results, diversifying traditional psychological sessions and other forms of individual and group support, making it more accessible to those who may have hesitated to seek help otherwise.

The Early Mother-Child Relationship and Its Impact on the Child’s Psychological Development and Adult Life in Light of Attachment Theory, with Special Consideration for Pastoral Ministry

Contributor

The primary objective of my research was to contextualise the psychological dimensions of attachment theory within a theological framework. Specifically, I aimed to scrutinise the broad spectrum of interpretations stemming from Bowlby’s work from a practical-theological perspective, with a particular focus on pastoral and pastoral-theological aspects. In doing so, I intend to construct a meaningful bridge between the realms of psychology and theology.

Applying the Cooperation Interpretation Model to The First Letter of Peter

Contributor

In the field of homiletics, one of the most intriguing questions is the dynamics of the text-pastor-preacher triad. It is notable that these constituent elements are often more amenable to individual scrutiny than when examined collectively. What constitutes the text? Who embodies the role of the preacher? And what precisely characterises the sermon? In contemporary discourse, we possess a clearer understanding of these components than ever before.